Glossary
Aluminum Blinds
Bamboo Shades
Basswood
Blackout Liner
Blackout Shades
Bottomrail
Café Shutter
Cellular Shades
Cloth Tape Ladders
Common Valance
Continuous Loop Lift Cord
Control Location
Controls
Cord Cleats
Cord Tilter
Cut-Out
Deluxe Cordless System
Depth
Factory Deduction
Faux Wood Blinds
Headrail
Height
Hobbled
Hold-Down Bracket
Honeycomb Shade
Horizontal Blind
Inserts
Inside Mount
Ladder Cords
Ladder Spacing
Lift Cord
Lift Cord Location
Light-Filtering
Louver
Matchstick blinds
Micro Blinds
Mini Blinds
Motorized Lift
Motorized Tilter
Mount Type
Mullion
Multiple blinds (or shades) on one head rail
One-Way Stack
Opaque
Outside Mount
Plantation Shutters
Pleated Shades
Projection
PVC Backing
Ramin Wood
Remote Control
Reverse Roll
Reverse Stack
Roller Shade
Roman Shade
Route Holes
Routeless
Semi-Opaque
Shutters
Slat
Spacers
Split into 2 or 3 Blinds on 1 Headrail
Split Stack
Spring Roller Lift Mechanism
Stack
Tape Edges
Three on One Head rail
Tile/Molding Cut Out
Tilter
Tilter Location
Top-Down/Bottom-Up
Two on One Head rail
Valance
Valance Returns
Vane
Venetian Blinds
Vertical Blinds
Wall Mount
Wand Tilter
Width
Wood Blinds
Woven wood shades
  • Aluminum Blinds:
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    Also called mini blinds, macro blinds, or micro blinds. Slats are curved aluminum and available in 1/2", 1", and 2" sizes. Aluminum blinds are one of the most affordable horizontal blind options.
  • Bamboo Shades:
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    See woven wood shades.
  • Basswood:
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    Wood widely regarded as the premier wood type for horizontal blinds because of its light weight and fine grain.
  • Blackout Liner:
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    An optional white polyester backing available on selected shades that ensures 100% light blockage and privacy.
  • Blackout Shades:
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    Refers to cellular shades that block 100% of outside light. Blackout is often a good choice for bedrooms, nurseries, and media rooms.
  • Bottomrail:
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    The bottom-most slat on a horizontal blind or shade, often thicker and/or weighted to ensure proper hanging.
  • Café Shutter:
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    A shutter that covers only the bottom half of a window.
  • Cellular Shades:
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    A type of fabric shade that combines two or more sheets of pleated fabric, also referred to as "honeycomb shades". Available in both single and double cell configurations with light filtering fabrics with double cell offering superior insulation. Blackout shades offer the greatest amount of insulation and light blockage.
  • Cloth Tape Ladders:
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    Decorative option available on some two-inch wood, faux wood, and aluminum blinds which replaces the standard braided cord ladders with 1½" solid twill fabric tapes available in 16 different colors.
  • Common Valance:
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    A single, continuous valance that covers 2 or more blinds.
  • Continuous Loop Lift Cord:
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    The continuous loop lift cord is an optional lift mechanism that consists of a single looped lift cord and clutch assembly which raises and lowers the shade. This option is highly recommended on very large shades.
  • Control Location:
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    Refers to the placement of the tilt and draw controls on vertical blinds. The standard control location is right.
  • Controls:
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    Refers to the mechanisms that allow you to raise, lower, open, close, or tilt blinds and shades. Controls are cords, wands, or chains.
  • Cord Cleats:
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    Cleats are small hooks to hang excess cording on to keep it out of the way.
  • Cord Tilter:
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    Cord used to control the angle of a blinds slats or vanes, commonly referred to as "opening and closing" the blind.
  • Cut-Out:
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    Procedure where a portion of a blind or shade is cut more narrow than the rest. This might be needed where there is tile or molding that narrows a portion of a window opening.
  • Deluxe Cordless System:
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    Option available on cellular shades that eliminates the lift cord. The shade is raised and lowered by simply pushing up or pulling down on the bottomrail. Note the sizes available with this option are limited and the headrail color is white only.
  • Depth:
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    The distance measured from the front edge of a window opening to the back. Extension Brackets: Optional brackets used to bring a blind out away from the mounting surface.
  • Factory Deduction:
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    The amount automatically trimmed off a shade or blind by the factory to ensure the proper fit of an inside mount. The amount will vary depending on the individual products.
  • Faux Wood Blinds:
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    Very popular alternative to wood blinds. Man-made material that gives the appearance of wood at a lower cost. Faux wood blinds will not warp, crack, or peel and are especially well suited for extreme climates. Faux wood is typically 20-30% heavier than real wood.
  • Headrail:
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    The metal housing along the top of a blind or shade that includes the working mechanisms. Head rail configurations include 1 blind on 1 head rail (standard); 2 blinds on 1 head rail; and 3 blinds on 1 head rail.
  • Height:
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    The window measurement from top to bottom.
  • Hobbled:
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    Option on fabric roman shades that adds horizontal pleats to the fabric.
  • Hold-Down Bracket:
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    Used to hold the bottom rail in place, such as on a door.
  • Honeycomb Shade:
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    See cellular shade
  • Horizontal Blind:
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    A blind consisting of slats running horizontally that can be tilted and lifted. Also called venetian blinds.
  • Inserts:
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    Inserts are long plastic sleeves available with some fabric verticals and provide a solid backing for the fabric which results in a greater degree of privacy and insulation.
  • Inside Mount:
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    Installing a blind or shade inside the window frame.
  • Ladder Cords:
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    The vertical cords that support and control the individual slats of a horizontal blind.
  • Ladder Spacing:
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    The distance between ladder cords.
  • Lift Cord:
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    A pull cord that raises and lowers a blind or shade.
  • Lift Cord Location:
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    Refers to the placement of the lift cords on horizontal blinds and shades. The standard lift cord location is right. On very small width horizontal blinds a lift cord may not be available.
  • Light-Filtering:
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    See semi-opaque.
  • Louver:
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    Usually refers to the individual vanes in a vertical blind or the individual slats in the shutter.
  • Matchstick blinds:
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    See woven wood shades.
  • Micro Blinds:
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    See aluminum blinds.
  • Mini Blinds:
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    See aluminum blinds.
  • Motorized Lift:
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    Optional lift mechanism that raises and lowers a blind or shade with the use of a wireless remote.
  • Motorized Tilter:
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    Optional tilt mechanism that controls the angle of the slats or vanes with the use of a wireless remote.
  • Mount Type:
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    Refers to the way in which the blind will be hung, either inside or outside the window opening (frame). Inside mount blinds are mounted inside the window opening that is recessed from the wall. Outside mount blinds hang outside the window opening on a wood trim, wall. or door.
  • Mullion:
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    Metal, wood, or vinyl frame where two separate window sections meet within the same window opening.
  • Multiple blinds (or shades) on one head rail:
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    Two or three separate blinds mounted on a single head rail. Usually used to cover very wide windows to make operation easier and reduce stress on hardware mechanisms. Also provides the flexibility of raising one blind while keeping the other lowered. Each individual blind will have it's own controls and thus operate independently. Single continuous head rail and valance. On some products this option is required for guarantee and warranty.
  • One-Way Stack:
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    Refers to vertical blinds that open in one direction to stack to one side of the window.
  • Opaque:
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    see blackout.
  • Outside Mount:
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    Installing a blind or shade outside the window frame, usually to a wood frame, wall, or door.
  • Plantation Shutters:
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    see shutters.
  • Pleated Shades:
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    Pleated shades are made of fabric with evenly spaced horizontal pleats. They are a less expensive alternative to cellular shades. Pleated shades have visible cords running vertically through the fabric.
  • Projection:
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    The distance from the wall a window treatment extends into a room.
  • PVC Backing:
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    Option available on fabric vertical blinds which increases insulation and privacy and provides a uniform outside appearance. The standard backing is a curved white PVC vane with clear plastic groovers which hold the fabric in place.
  • Ramin Wood:
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    A dense, imported hardwood used with many value-priced wood blinds. Ramin wood is approximately 10% heavier than basswood.
  • Remote Control:
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    Battery-powered infrared remote control used to operate motorized blinds or shades.
  • Reverse Roll:
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    Option on roller shades where the fabric rolls off the front of the headrail rather than the back. Standard shades roll off the back side closest to the window.
  • Reverse Stack:
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    Vertical blind stack option where blind stacks to the side opposite from where the controls are located.
  • Roller Shade:
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    Flat panel of fabric or vinyl attached to a dowel with a roller spring mechanism for lifting.
  • Roman Shade:
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    A fabric shade that folds up accordion-style from the bottom, usually operated by lift cord.
  • Route Holes:
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    Refers to small holes in a standard blinds slats that the ladder cords run through.
  • Routeless:
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    Routeless blinds have small notches in the back of each slat instead of route holes and therefore offer superior privacy. In addition the slats on wood and faux wood products may be removed easily for cleaning if desired. Routeless blinds have ladder cords and are not available with cloth tapes.
  • Semi-Opaque:
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    Treatment that transmits filtered light with no view through the covering and provides privacy. Also called light-filtering.
  • Shutters:
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    Hinged vinyl or wood panels that may be folded across a window to diffuse light and add privacy. Shutters have adjustable louvers that function in much the same way as horizontal blinds in that they may be opened to admit light and allow a partial view outside while maintaining a fair amount of privacy inside. Shutters with louvers over two inches wide are sometimes referred to as Plantation Shutters.
  • Slat:
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    The individual pieces of material in a horizontal blind.
  • Spacers:
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    Used with mounting brackets to provide additional room between the mounting surface and the blind. A common use for spacers is for installing a blind over raised trim. Only for use with outside mounts.
  • Split into 2 or 3 Blinds on 1 Headrail:
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    Option which divides the overall width into two or three separate blinds mounted on a single headrail. Usually used to cover very wide windows to make operation easier and reduce stress on hardware mechanisms. Also provides the flexibility of raising one blind while keeping other(s) lowered. Each individual blind will have it's own controls and thus operate independently. There is a single continuous headrail and valance. On some sizes this option is required for guarantee and warranty.
  • Split Stack:
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    Vertical blind stack option where blind opens in the middle of the window and stacks evenly on either side.
  • Spring Roller Lift Mechanism:
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    Standard lift mechanism on roller shades. Shades are raised and lowered by grasping bottom fabric hem. There are no lift cords with the spring roller lift.
  • Stack:
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    The area in which the slats of a blind "stack" when opened. On vertical blinds, choosing a left stack or a right stack will determine which way the blind opens. For example if you order a vertical blind with a left stack the vanes will stack on the left side of the window when fully opened. Another stack option is the split stack in which the blinds open from the middle and stack evenly on both the left and right sides. With horizontal blinds, "stack height" refers to the space at the top of the blind that is taken up by the slats when they are fully raised. The smaller the stack height, the greater the view you will have to the outside.
  • Tape Edges:
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    Optional fabric accent available on most natural wood shades. Tape edges are 3/4" solid twill cloth tapes stitched along the sides of the shade. The tapes are available in 12 designer colors and the cost is $20 per shade.
  • Three on One Head rail:
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    Three blinds or shades mounted on a single head rail. Usually used to cover a wide window expanse to make operation easier and to reduce stress on hardware mechanisms. Also provides the flexibility of raising one blind while keeping the other lowered. Each individual blind or shade will have it's own controls and thus operate independently.
  • Tile/Molding Cut Out:
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    Procedure where a portion of a blind is cut more narrow than the rest. This might be needed where there is tile or molding that narrows a portion of a window opening.
  • Tilter:
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    Mechanism that controls the angle of the slats or vanes. A cord tilter is standard on most 2" horizontal blinds and consists of two separate pull cords with tassels. A wand tilter is standard on all 1" blinds and optional on some 2" blinds although the cord tilter is highly recommended on all 2" wood & faux wood blinds. The wand is made of wood or plastic and will open and close the slats when twisted.
  • Tilter Location:
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    Refers to the location of the tilter mechanism on horizontal blinds. The standard tilter location is left. On very small width blinds a center tilter location may be required.
  • Top-Down/Bottom-Up:
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    This option is available on shades and uses two sets of lift cords which enables the shade to be opened by lowering the top down or by lifting the bottom up. Standard shades are opened by lifting the bottom up only. Very good for protecting your privacy while still allowing light in.
  • Two on One Head rail:
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    Two blinds or shades mounted on a single head rail. Usually used to cover a wide window expanse to keep a single treatment from sagging in the middle or to provide the flexibility of raising one blind while keeping the other lowered. Each individual blind or shade will have it's own controls and thus operate independently.
  • Valance:
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    A decorative treatment used to cover the face of a head rail.
  • Valance Returns:
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    The two side pieces of an outside mount valance that extend from the front valance back to the wall or window frame.
  • Vane:
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    The vertical louvers or slats in a vertical blind.
  • Venetian Blinds:
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    See horizontal blinds.
  • Vertical Blinds:
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    Window treatment featuring vertical vanes that can be swiveled open and closed or opened in either a split or one-way stack.
  • Wall Mount:
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    Type of vertical blind installation where the head rail is mounted on the wall or trim surrounding the door or window.
  • Wand Tilter:
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    Mechanism operated with a twisting motion and used to swivel vertical blinds or tilt horizontal blinds, commonly referred to as "opening and closing" the blind.
  • Width:
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    Window measurement from the left to right.
  • Wood Blinds:
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    Available with 2" or 1" slats wood blinds are the perfect alternative to shutters. Made from basswood or ramin wood they are among the most beautiful and enduring window treatments available today. They are also very good natural insulators.
  • Woven wood shades:
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    Shade type made of natural materials like wood, fiber, and bamboo. Woven woods can be raised and lowered like a cellular shade. Also called bamboo or matchstick shades.